David Gilmour – Revisiting His Solo Debut Album From 1978


DAVID GILMOUR – I just can’t go any longer without writing about the David Gilmour debut and self-titled solo album, (which was released back in May of 1978 on Columbia Records). I get drawn into the bluesy and progressive feel, tones and vibes that David Gilmour plays with his guitar, always have and will. The album opener Mihalis, is an instrumental that not only serves me right while taking a long cruise in the car, it serves me right while I’m kicked back on my recliner… while I’m brain surfing with eclectic thoughts. The same can be said for this entire album, which was produced by David Gilmour.

Without any question, it is my personal belief that this debut album from David Gilmour was the crème de la crème genius coming from this Rock legend, while not making Rock historical music with Pink Floyd. This album proved David Gilmour could step outside the world famous shadow of Pink Floyd and create a Rock legacy as an individual. An album so captivating in it’s mellow simplicity, all the while these nine songs are very far removed from being construed as simple. As with his iconic tenure with Pink Floyd, David Gilmour enriches the song through his tempered vocals and astute guitar playing on his solo debut, consequently both accentuates unrivaled and enormous clarity.

The backing chorus on So Far Away cries out Pink Floyd character, while the piano gives a richness to the overall sound and everlasting appeal that comes across to my ears. As I listen to this album, especially the song Short And Sweet, I realize that this Rock music that David Gilmour wrote and/or played is a progression of Psychedelic Rock. David Gilmour, along with Pink Floyd, seemed to capture a sound that was both Psychedelic and Progressive combined, fusing the two into a whole new genre of sound. Was Pink Floyd the first band to accomplish this? Realistically no, once you factor The Moody Blues into the Rock music history discussion.

It’s extremely difficult to write about this David Gilmour album without mentioning Pink Floyd, frankly it’s impossible. Just the vocal presence alone of David Gilmour should remind Rock enthusiasts of Pink Floyd. When you hear David’s guitar chops on Raise My Rent, how can one not hear or think of Pink Floyd? Nevertheless, this is not a Pink Floyd album, it is David Gilmour at his most prolific and inspiring. I may not listen to this album every day, still, I do listen to this album at least once a week… a couple of times. Sometimes I will only listen to certain songs, with the instrumentals Mihalis and Raise My Rent along with There’s No Way Out Of Here being my top three favorites.

I’ve stopped long ago, trying to figure out the magic behind the vocals and guitar of David Gilmour. I turn to this album when I need to find some sort of clarity in my thoughts, even if it makes my thoughts stray into that eclectic stratosphere. Without trying to over think what I hear, all I can do is just listen and absorb the Rock music that David created. The sounds that escape from this David Gilmour solo album are calming and cool for my senses, making me step back momentarily, having me realize that what I’m hearing can dictate a change in my mood… in ways I’ll never take for granted.

Track Listing For David Gilmour:

Mihalis

There’s No Way Out Of Here

Cry From The Street

So Far Away

Short And Sweet

Raise My Rent

No Way

Deafinitely

I Can’t Breath Anymore

Musicians:

David Gilmour – guitars, keyboards, vocals

Rick Wills – bass & vocals

Willie Wilson – drums & percussion

* Mick Weaver & David Gilmour – piano on So Far Away

* Backing vocals on So Far Away and There’s No Way Out Of Here: Carlena Williams, Debbie Doss and Shirley Roden

* For more info on David Gilmour, click the link below:

DAVID GILMOUR – Official Website

LONG LIVE DAVID GILMOUR.

Stone.

2 Responses to “David Gilmour – Revisiting His Solo Debut Album From 1978”

  1. I have to agree this is an excellent album and still sounds great over thirty years later

    • metalodyssey Says:

      Doesn’t this album still burst at the seams with relevancy or what?! I think I’m gonna chill it down and listen to this album tonight as well. After some Amon Amarth “Surtur Rising”! 🙂

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