BRUCE LAMONT “Feral Songs For The Epic Decline” – Transcends Rock Music’s Complacency


BRUCE LAMONT – Upon my very first listen to Feral Songs For The Epic Decline,  I realized quickly that Bruce Lamont has created music that is a soundtrack to the inner Metal mind. What is the inner Metal mind you query? Why, it is all of the thoughts, sounds and sensory subtleties that just magically make their unexpected visit, (within my own inner Metal mind), during the course of a day… or two. You see, what Bruce Lamont has created here, is Experimental meets Industrial, coalescing with the progressive and tribal, while colliding with drifting atmospherics… the end result being Bruce’s honest and credible interpretation of what’s likely his real music ideal.

If there is a defining constant I hear throughout Feral Songs For The Epic Decline, it is Bruce’s interpretation of combining so many musical elements and styles together and making them come to a boil with an almost late 70’s progressive trip, while adhering to relevance. I do sense a keen sense of hard versus heavy balance, in regards to what Bruce Lamont has created here, due to my feeling and hearing some conscious restraint of venturing too far into the absolute heavy realm. Refraining from total heaviness comes across smoothly within his music, a more progressive approach provides the balance of musical sounds Bruce so convincingly conveys.

What Bruce Lamont seems to thrive on, is pulling music from across the spectrum, then he takes musical matters into his own imaginative hands and creates unique songs that tantalize with their modernistic genius. Throughout this eclectically put together album of avant-garde amassment, Bruce Lamont stays true to his varied style of putting a song together… the listener should expect the unexpected. Just when there are dreamy moments of Pink Floydian progressive space circulating in The Book Of The Law, don’t be surprised to hear next, a futuristic Wild West sound which connects to an extreme psychosis encounter on Deconstructing Self Destruction.

One Who Stands On The Earth is this album’s epic, at 11:44 long. Bruce’s baritone voice along with his acoustic guitar and background Industrial fuzz combines for a continuum of building this song from it’s foundation. Bruce lends some mysterious chanting, which lends way to his saxophone building a melancholic passage with the assistance of tribal background chants. These background tribal chants give way to and combine with rhythmic tribal drum beats, bringing One Who Stands On The Earth to it’s finish, with a synthetic whirling sound being the final exclamation point. The presence of these sounds, brings about an open atmosphere of near exhilaration.

It is the all encompassing manner of disorder by intention, that makes Bruce Lamont’s songs enthrall me to such a high level of admiration. Where else can one hear or who else can make a saxophone coexist so brilliantly, amidst a flurry of Industrial sounds and an extra-terrestrial musical climate as Bruce accomplishes on Disgruntled Employer? Extraordinary is this song with the inclusion of foggy tribal chants, generating a feeling of what an out of body experience might just feel like.

If you have an open-mindedness of listening to a broad based musical puzzle being put together, with a legion of nuances on steroids, then Feral Songs For The Epic Decline is unquestionably an album for you to absorb. Bruce Lamont created each song, sings and plays all the instruments heard on this album, being his first full length. What more could I appreciate from a solo artist, with such intense vision, than Bruce Lamont?

I’m heralding Bruce Lamont and his album Feral Songs For The Epic Decline, especially during an era when the Rock Music Industry is stagnating from complacency. Bruce Lamont’s musical style is inconsistent with the mainstream norm, obliterating a false mindset that artistic music ingenuity is no longer in vogue. This is my reasoning for admiring what Bruce Lamont has achieved here, which invigorates me to recommend Feral Songs For The Epic Decline to any and all open minded fans of Rock, Progressive and Ambient Music.

* Bruce Lamont’s associated bands are: Yakuza, Circle of Animals and Led Zeppelin 2.

* Feral Songs For The Epic Decline will be released on January 25, 2011, on At A Loss Recordings.

* For more info on Bruce Lamont, click on the link below:

BRUCE LAMONT – myspace music

Track Listing For Feral Songs For The Epic Decline:

One Who Stands On The Earth

The Epic Decline

Year Without Summer

The Book Of The Law

Disgruntled Employer

Deconstructing Self Destruction

2 Then The 3

LONG LIVE BRUCE LAMONT.

Stone.

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One Response to “BRUCE LAMONT “Feral Songs For The Epic Decline” – Transcends Rock Music’s Complacency”

  1. […] BRUCE LAMONT “Feral Songs For The Epic Decline” – Transcends Rock Music’s Complacency […]

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