Archive for the vintage punk rock albums Category

AFI – All Hallow’s E.P. is a Horror Punk gem

Posted in 1990's alternative rock music, 1990's punk rock albums, 1990's punk rock bands, 1990's punk rock music, 1990's rock music, Album Review, alternative rock bands, alternative rock music, alternative rock music albums, classic punk rock, cool album covers, creepy album covers, essential punk rock albums, essential punk rock songs, horror punk, horror punk album covers, horror punk album review, horror punk albums, horror punk rock music, horror punk songs, metal odyssey, Music, old school punk rock, Punk rock, punk rock album review, punk rock album reviews, punk rock albums, punk rock cover songs, punk rock music, punk rock musicians, punk rock songs, rock and roll, rock music, spooky album covers, vintage punk rock albums with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 18, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

AFI "All Hallows EP" small picA couple of years ago, I purchased All Hallow’s E.P. by AFI… man, this is a cool Horror Punk gem. Released on November 3, 1999, on Nitro Records, this is AFI when they were creating Horror Punk and it is worth every penny I spent on it. A tidy E.P. it is, with four songs that are lathered with quality Horror Punk attitude and speed. Davey Havok on lead vocals sounds vintage, even though it has only been about a decade since this E.P.’s release. Every time I listen to All Hallow’s E.P., I walk away believing Davey Havok was born to sing this style of Punk Rock. I could listen all day to this Horror Punk style of AFI. I have been currently rummaging through my Metal and Punk Music collection, sifting through the spooky titles of both albums and songs and putting them on my daily rotation of music listening. Horror Punk will always stand out when searching for the creepy tunes, All Hallow’s E.P. is an obvious choice. With the Halloween season knocking at my Metal doorstep, rounding up the scary stuff to listen to has become an annual right of Horror passage for me.

The four songs on All Hallow’s E.P. are: Fall Children, Halloween, The Boy Who Destroyed The World and TotalImmortal. (That is not a typo, there is not supposed to be a space between the words Total Immortal for this song title). Halloween is a cover song, originally written and sung by Glenn Danzig when he fronted the legendary Misfits. AFI covers Halloween with all deserved and spooked out respect. The built in mechanism of the lyrics, coupled with the musical undertones of dread, makes these four songs explode with the dynamics of Horror Punk. My favorite track is… a tie. So, my favorite tracks are Halloween (due to it being a Misfits cover song and it is unreal good) and TotalImmortal. Being the last song out of the four, TotalImmortal is really the exclamation point of All Hallow’s E.P., it has the unrestrained Punk Rock energy that leaves me yearning for more of these songs from AFI.

AFI as they appeared on All Hallow’s E.P.:

Davey Havok on vocals

Jade Puget on guitar

Hunter on bass 

Adam Carson on drums

AFI "All Hallows EP" large pic

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Motorhead and Anthrax both covered “God Save The Queen”

Posted in 1970's punk rock, 1980's heavy metal albums, 1980's thrash metal music, 1980's heavy metal music, 1980's metal music, 1990's heavy metal music, classic heavy metal albums, classic metal, classic punk rock, cool album covers, cover songs, essential heavy metal albums, extreme music, heavy metal album covers, heavy metal albums, heavy metal music, heavy metal vocalists, legends of punk rock, Metal, metal music, Motorhead, Music, old school heavy metal, old school punk rock, punk rock cover songs, punk rock music, punk rock songs, Thrash Metal, vintage heavy metal albums, vintage punk rock albums, Vocals with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 28, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

main-150Motorhead and Anthrax. Each band is a prominent member in the Metal Music world. Motorhead and Anthrax have always hinted, albeit with Metal stylings, their musical taste for Punk Rock Music. Both of these legendary Metal bands covered the Sex Pistols classic “God Save The Queen” from the “Never Mind The Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols” album, (released in October of 1977). This song was written of course, by Paul Cook, Steve Jones, John Lydon (Johnny Rotten) and Glen Matlock. Both cover versions are really cool and heavy, with Motorhead having their unmistakable, heavy coated vocals and bass guitar of Lemmy Kilmister leading the way. You know it’s Motorhead when you hear their cover of this prolific song… no pretensions, no frills, no sugar coating. The Motorhead cover version of “God Save The Queen” can be found on the “We Are Motorhead” album, (released on May 16, 2000). The Anthrax cover version is found on the EP – “Armed And Dangerous”, (released in February of 1985). In my Metal opinion, Anthrax covers “God Save The Queen” with convincing Punk Rock attitude, the reasons for this lays in the lead vocals of Joey Belladonna as well as the backing vocals. Musically, Anthrax is right on the Punk Rock bulls eye, which always led me to believe this particular lineup could have experimented even more with Punk Rock songs.

Anthrax has been a diverse band throughout their career, the same can be said about Motorhead too. Therefore, it is only fitting that these two bands picked up “God Save The Queen” to cover – and cover it well, both of these bands did. Of course, I repeatedly state that there is nothing like the original. I would be hallucinating, if I were to say that there is any cover song of “God Save The Queen” out there, that blows away the Sex Pistols original. Regardless of that mindset, both Motorhead and Anthrax honestly pay tribute to this song and the Sex Pistols with the upmost Metal respect. The proof is in the cover songs themselves, they both pulsate with the Punk Rock angst and anti-establishment message that the Sex Pistols originally created in the first place. I always felt this message in the song’s music, while hearing it of course, in the lyrics. 

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Misfits “Earth A.D.” – 1983 Punk Rock album revisited

Posted in 1980's punk rock albums, 1980's punk rock bands, 1980's punk rock music, Album Review, classic punk rock, cool album covers, creepy album covers, Danzig, essential punk rock albums, extreme music, Misfits, misfits album covers, Music, old school punk rock, punk rock album review, punk rock albums, punk rock music, punk rock songs, spooky album covers, vintage punk rock albums with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 22, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

The Misfits… Punk Rock… Glenn Danzig on lead vocals… “Earth A.D.” is worth every listening second of my time, for these three reasons alone. “Earth A.D.”, (released in 1983), is the definitive Misfits album to own. (That is my belief). This release defined the Misfits as not only a genre splitting Punk Rock Band to reckon with, yet it served as an example of how truly aggressive, musically, the Misfits were at the time. This album could very well be defined as being one of the starting points, in orchestrating the birth of Horror Punk Rock. Dark and at times demonic, “Earth A.D.” ventured into subject matter and lyrical territory that was never explored by Punk Rock legends the likes of the Ramones or Sex Pistols. Would “Earth A.D.” be a survivor if released today, in 2009? Could this album rise above the current environment of musical expectancy, where immediate acknowledgment and acceptance from the narrow minded mainstream is practically never achieved by Extreme Music acts? Probably not, where if this album saw it’s release happen now, it would be thrown onto the heap, only to be cherished by those of us who know and understand what this music is really about.

In essence, the “Earth A.D.” album has achieved a continuous running, underground style of following since 1983. “Earth A.D.” continues to remind many of us, what a complete package really means when putting together an Extreme Music album. From the album artwork to the music found within, it is a vintage release that is looked upon for artistic guidance and reference. How relevant is this Misfits album in 2009? From the way I see it, this Misfits classic with it’s hardness and  heaviness, holds up to or exceeds many current albums that come advertised as being so called hard and heavy – regardless of genre. Music appreciation parallels fine art appreciation, whereas it boils down to personal preference and often times bias. What I feel cannot be denied, however, is the acknowledgment of a genre defining moment, one in which eclipses any commercial barometer of pop culture normalcy… enter “Earth A.D.”.

In my Metal opinion, you can trace Thrash Metal roots back to “Earth A.D.”, with the guitar riffs and speed, combined with the fury of the rhythm section. Each song is short, as per the trademark of most Punk Rock songs. The entire playing time is about 20 minutes or so, yet the total impact of the Punk heaviness this album provides, is it’s true measuring stick. “Earth A.D.” is a must for Misfits fans, Punk Rock fans and Metal fans, especially those who want to hear how Extreme Music history was molded and shaped into form. I can recall a trip I once made, to a world renowned art museum in New York City. One of the most memorable moments for me while I was there, was witnessing an extremely wide and tall modern art sculpture. This sculpture was made out of laundry detergent boxes. The entire area surrounding this sculpture was cordoned off with red, velvet ropes. In my mind, I have put red, velvet ropes around the Misfits “Earth A.D.” album years ago. This music is just as good, if not better, than a modern art sculpture made out of laundry detergent boxes. 

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