Archive for 1970's classic rock bands

KEV MOORE – A METAL ODYSSEY INTERVIEW!

Posted in classic rock music, Hard Rock, hard rock bands, hard rock music, Heavy Metal, heavy metal music, metal odyssey, Music, punk rock music, rock 'n' roll, rock and roll, rock music, rock music interviews, rock music news with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 5, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

(Photo courtesy of Kev Moore archives)

The roots of Rock ‘N’ Roll. That’s what has shaped and molded the Rock, Hard Rock and Heavy Metal we all listen to today, including their respective sub-genres. Here at Metal Odyssey, I always try to acknowledge the bands and musicians who have been a part of Rock ‘N’ Roll’s evolution. Many bands and musicians that have carved out their own place in Rock ‘N’ Roll history may not be cracking the Billboard charts or walking the Hollywood red carpets. Still, these bands and musicians hold the same weight of importance for me, especially when their contributions to the history of Rock ‘N’ Roll are of quality, sincerity and time tested credibility. These are the bands and musicians who don’t create music because they feel they have to, they create based on their genuine love they have for Rock ‘N’ Roll. Step right up… Kev Moore.

From Punk Rock to Pub Rock with Rock, Hard Rock and Heavy Metal in between, Kev Moore has played it and lived it. Kev Moore is currently recording his new album, Blue Odyssey and was very considerate to take the time to answer questions for Metal Odyssey. Kev talks about his upcoming album, where his Rock ‘N’ Roll career started, being a one time member of The Gonads, his biggest Rock influence and of course… being the current vocalist and bass guitarist for the legendary BC Sweet. There is also Kev’s membership with Christie and his past membership with Graham Olivers Saxon and so much more… I’ll just let Kev tell you all about it in his words!

* Definitely check out the links at the end of this interview… so you can learn more about the terrific bands that Kev Moore has been a part of throughout his Rock ‘N’ Roll life.

Stone: Kev, you are currently in the studio recording a new album called “Blue Odyssey”, can you elaborate and give fans a sneak peak at what to expect?

Kev: Well, at the beginning of the year, I took a 2 month tour around the major music cities of the American South, Nashville, Memphis, Helena, Clarksdale, New Orleans, Austin, etc, and the album is basically a ‘road diary’ – that is to say, each song charts my journey and experiences and changes musical style accordingly, so it’s a fairly eclectic mix!  I’ve been lucky enough to have contributions from some American blues musicians, plus a legendary DJ, “Sunshine” Sonny Payne from King Biscuit Time. I don’t claim that it’s bona fide blues, but rather, the result of how my music has been influenced by being immersed in that environment. It’s nearing completion, and should be out in a couple of months. For now, you can hear a small taster by clicking here: Kevin Andrew Moore – myspace music

Stone: Is Tubeless Hearts where it all began for Kev Moore?

Kev: Tubeless Hearts is the band where I began seriously gigging around the UK (having spent two years in a touring band in Scandinavia) – but the two bands from my teens, Midnight Express ( a new wave pub band) and Crosstown Traffic (complicated rock band!)  were where I first started developing my songwriting and stage craft.  In fact, Stef Cybichowski, the drummer from Crosstown Traffic, has put down some drums for my new album, over 30 years after we last worked together! Tubeless Hearts however, became a mainstay for me, the nucleus stayed together many years and we recorded a single (in 1982) and an album (1994) that have become highly collectible. The album, “Three”, featured Graham Oliver from Saxon, and was retro-reviewed in the 100th issue of Powerplay magazine, as it’s begun to command silly money on the internet nowadays! Being in Tubeless Hearts proved to be a springboard to many other areas of my career.

Stone: As noted in your introduction, you have been a part of many bands during, your music career, as well, being a solo artist. What is Kev Moore’s most proud music achievement thus far?

Kev: It’s difficult to pick one. From a live perspective, I would probably have to say playing at Moscow Dynamo stadium with Christie on our tour of Russia. It was an amazing gig, and we were so well looked after, being granted admittance to Lenin’s tomb in Red Square – quite something!
Recording wise, I was always very proud of the Tubeless Hearts album, and whilst it didn’t pull up any trees on release, history seems to have been kind to it. Though I have to say, my first solo album, which I made available as a free download, was a big achievement for me, writing, playing and producing everything on it.

(Photo courtesy of Kev Moore archives)

Stone: Being the lead vocalist and bassist of BC Sweet, are there moments when you stop to reflect on the significant Rock roots of this band?

Kev: Very much so. In fact, the roots and history of this band are so strong, and feekings have run high over the years, mostly before my time with the band. Andy Scott runs his version of The Sweet, as does Steve Priest, who recently came out of retirement in L.A. As you know, this band was started by the late Brian Connolly who I had done some shows with as a part of Christie, and met him several times. After Brian died, the band decided to continue with various line up changes and evolved and continued with the blessing of former members into what you see today. For my part, I feel privileged to be able to play such a great canon of pop rock material, and I like to think we pay homage to the hard rock side of the Sweet. We feature some of the rockier stuff such as “Turn it Down” and one of the great ‘b’ sides “Burn on the Flame”.  From my perspective as a bassist, I’m very lucky indeed to be part of a rhythm section with Pete Phipps (Glitterband, Eurthymics, Mike Rutherford, XTC) I like to think we stay true to the rock roots – even the bubblegum songs are played a little more forcefully, shall we say!

Stone: Do you regularly stay in touch with Graham Oliver and/or Steve Dawson?

Kev: Graham and I have always stayed in touch and often discuss working together again, but it’s always a case of trying to find time that suits us both, which is easier said than done, particularly with me living in Spain! I regard him as one of my closest friends, a great guitarist and a real gentleman. Steve’s also a great bloke, but I haven’t seen him in a while.

Metal Odyssey Note: Graham Oliver and Steve Dawson are founding/former members of Saxon, a pioneering band of the NWOBHM.

(Photo courtesy of Kev Moore archives)

(Pictured above: Graham Oliver/left, Kev Moore/right)

Stone: Which Saxon song was your favorite to perform live?

Kev: There are two that spring to mind. Firstly, “Dallas 1pm”. I’ve actually been to the spot where JFK was assassinated, and I think the song is so theatrical, you don’t need a video, it tells the story beautifully, as all the best songs do. The second is “Strong Arm of the Law” – another story in a song, but what I love about it is the sheer unstoppable boogie of it, it’s real fun to hammer that one out live!

Metal Odyssey Note: Currently known as Oliver/Dawson Saxon, Kev Moore was lead vocalist and played bass on the first tour with Son Of A Bitch… which later was renamed – Oliver/Dawson Saxon, after Steve Dawson joined up with Graham Oliver. Kev Moore was lead vocalist while on tour as a member of the first incarnation of Oliver/Dawson Saxon, while Steve Dawson played bass. Kev Moore never recorded for either Son Of A Bitch or Oliver/Dawson Saxon. However, Kev Moore did sing and play bass on Graham Oliver’s solo album – “End of an Era”.

Stone: What is your current and/or future status as a member of Christie?

Kev: I’m a fully paid up member of Christie – though we took something of a sabbatical from around 2004-2008. In 2009 we took things up a gear to coincide with Jeff releasing a double CD “Floored Masters” and did a Summer European tour, which was a blast, resurrecting a few Christie songs that had never been played live before. This year, we have a couple of shows in Germany, and I’ve invited Jeff to come over to work on some material in my studio.

Stone: How did you get introduced to The Gonads, resulting in your being a past member of their band?

Kev: The Gonads is a long story. I formed a duo back in the 90’s with a guitarist called Dave Sargent for a covers album project that someone had put the money up for. I approached “Gang of Four ” producer Bob Miller (he’d done some work with us on one of the Tubeless Hearts album tracks) and he suggested a guy called Clyde Ward who had a studio down in Southampton. Well, the sessions with Clyde were great, we became great friends, which we still are to this day. Clyde became very succesful working with European dance acts such as U96,  and also as a co-writer and producer for Right Said Fred, but in his heart he’s a rocker, sharing a love of Philo and Thin Lizzy with me!  He’s also a close friend of Garry Bushell, and they had developed a side project resurrecting The Gonads for a one off single. It created such a stir in the U.S. that Dave and I were recruited into a newly-reformed Gonads, and we toured the East and West coasts of America in 1998, eventually releasing three albums, the last of which I filmed a couple of videos for which ended up on Garry’s dvd. Once again commitments have prevented me from doing anything since then, though when I spoke to Garry a few months ago, he said how he’d love to do something with Clyde and I again some day. One of the highlights of my time with The Gonads was playing the legendary (and now sadly gone) CBGB’s in New York.

Stone: Your 2009 single “Derby Pride” is a fine Rockin’ salute to the Derby County Football Club! Will a series of songs for the Derby Football Club materialize to CD?

Kev: Following Derby Pride, I did in fact record an entire album in homage to my team!  It’s done very well, mainly because Derby County have a huge and loyal fanbase. I sell it from my website mooremusic.biz and the club shop at Derby’s stadium, Pride park, also stock it.

Stone: Another single from 2009, “The Co-Op Cow” is a Pub Rocker that tells of a love that seemed to go astray. Is this song based on a real experience?

Kev: The Co-op Cow is also featured on the Derby album, this is because it refers to many landmarks around the Derby area, the Co-op cow of the title being the chief among them. It is a huge red neon cow, which advertises Co-op milk, and has many times been threatened with destruction, but I believe is now the subject of a preservation order. As a child, my abiding memory is of coming back into Derby on a cold night either by train or bus, and seeing the red neon glow in the night sky, and knowing you were nearly home. The story of lost love….not based on actual events, but it’s so generic, it could be any of us, couldn’t it? I was never stood up beneath the cow, but I’ve certainly been stood up!

(Photo courtesy of Kev Moore archives)

(Pictured above: Kev Moore live with Christie, Jeff Christie in center)

Stone: “The Turre Stomp” is a song that fuses together a mix of sounds, from Rock and Funk vibes with Middle Eastern strings, making for quite the fun listen. What influences tapped you on the shoulder for this song?

Kev: The Turre stomp is a song I’ve had kicking around for a while, and infact will be the last track on my Blue Odyssey album, completing the circle of the journey, if you will. Turre is the village in Southern Spain where I live. For those who don’t know, this area is the only classified ‘desert’ in Europe, and although irrigation and climate change over the last 25 years have changed it a lot, when I go up on the roof in midsummer, it really has that feel to it. It’s the area where Clint Eastwood made his famous western trilogy, and at the other end of our village, Indiana Jones was dragged down the ravine underneath the Nazi truck. I wanted to create a song that captured the heat, the dryness, and to some extent, the mystery. I tried a lot of sounds before I settled on the sitar, but once I had, it came together nicely.

Stone: What is the one thing you wish you could change about the Rock Music industry?

Kev: I think a lot of things need changing! But if I were to pick one……There’s been such a seismic shift in the way the industry works now, but I mourn the passing of the days when bands were signed with the understanding that they could be developed over a period of time. Let me take as an example Budgie, a great welsh power trio who were a big influence on me becoming a pro musician, and who I had the pleasure to meet a few years back. They were signed to A&M. They released a string of albums, probably 7 in as many years, touring regularly, never had a hit single!  Can you imagine a label sticking behind a band like that nowadays? It’s no surprise acts like Yes, Jethro Tull, Genesis, Fleetwood Mac etc, continue to sell, they were designed, and encouraged, for longevity.  Now, you’re lucky to even get your album out if a lead-in single flops. I know of artists who have to sit and watch their tapes gather dust on shelves, never to see a release. I’d like to see a return to The Music business instead of The music Business, if you know what I mean!

Stone: Who or what band has been the greatest influence on Kev Moore’s music career?

Kev: I think I’d have to say Trapeze. I’m not sure it necessarily comes out in my music, but from the moment I heard that band I thought “this is absolute perfection – funk and rock beautifully combined, wonderful understated incisive guitar, and that voice!”  I’ve met Glenn Hughes on several occasions and told him he was the single biggest influence on my becoming a professional musician. I kind of “back-dated” to Trapeze via Deep Purple. I was around 15, I’d been playing the drums for about 7 years, and then I bought “Burn”.  I just homed in on Glenn’s vocals and bass playing. I just remember thinking “that is what I want to do”.

Stone: Does Kev Moore make music or does music make Kev Moore?

Kev: It’s a vicious circle, Stone! I think it’s something like an energy exchange. Perhaps, at one time, I’d have been tempted to say the former, but having had a longer than usual period away from the stage, I’d have to say that on balance, it is music that defines me. Simply, I’ve never really known, nor wanted to do, anything else.

(Photo courtesy of Kev Moore archives)

(Pictured above: Graham Oliver/left, Kev Moore/right)

* For more info on Kev Moore, just click here: mooremusic.biz

* Listen to Kev Moor’s music, browse around and purchase the digital downloads of “Derby Pride”, “The Co-op Cow” and “The Turre Stomp” by clicking here: KEV MOORE: THE MUSIC BOX

* For more info on Oliver/Dawson Saxon, just click the link below:

OLIVER/DAWSON SAXON – myspace music

* For more info on The Gonads… click here: THE GONADS

* For more info on Jeff Christie and his band Christie, click on the link below:

JEFF CHRISTIE – Official Website

LONG LIVE KEV MOORE & HIS ROCK ‘N’ ROLL!

Stone.

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MY FAVORITE HARD ROCK ALBUM COVER IS…

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's hard rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, Hard Rock, hard rock albums, hard rock bands, hard rock music, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

Well, I posted what my favorite Heavy Metal album cover, (ever), is on March 25, just a few days ago. Iron Maiden’s debut album – Iron Maiden was/is my choice. Now, for my favorite Hard Rock album cover, (ever), that I would like to share to all, on the planet we call… Earth. Nazareth – No Mean City. This incredibly underrated Rock meets Hard Rock album was released back in January of 1979. May The Sunshine has it’s unique style – from a folk chorus to it’s overlay of genuine Nazareth Rock, it’s a fun filled listen for me always. The ballad Star is another tremendous listen, showing just how Nazareth could diversify their sound with the upmost credibility. Just To Get Into It is indicative of Nazareth Hard Rock, with Dan McCafferty’s vocals spilling out in all of his raspy splendor.

This unreal great cover art on No Mean City just screams Heavy Metal… only this is seriously a Rock colliding with Hard Rock album, in my Metal opinion. Rodney Matthews is the artist/illustrator for this incredible No Mean City album cover. In doing my Metal research, Rodney Matthews has quite the illustrious career in illustrating album covers for many bands of notoriety: Scorpions, Magnum, Thin Lizzy, Tygers of Pan Tang and Diamond Head… just to name a few. I applaud this fantastically talented artist, he gets a Metal Odyssey nod of Metal approval – multi-tenfold!

A long time ago, in a Metal year far, far, away, I bought this No Mean City album from a “cut-out” bin at a record store called Strawberries Records & Tapes. If you like, you can check out the post I did on this legendary album, with a more detailed review, by clicking on the header below:

NAZARETH “NO MEAN CITY” – 1979 HARD ROCK ALBUM IS A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH

What is your favorite Hard Rock album cover? No Mean City just takes the Hard Rock cake for me.

Stone.

ANGEL – “THE WINTER SONG” IS MY BLIZZARD OF 2010 THEME SONG!

Posted in 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's hard rock, 1970's heavy metal, 1970's heavy metal albums, 1970's heavy metal bands, 1970's heavy metal music, 1970's Rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, 1980's hard rock bands, 1980's heavy metal music, classic rock 1978, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, classic rock songs, everyday experiences, everyday people, feel good stories, hard rock bands, hard rock music, hard rock songs, heavy metal albums, heavy metal bands, heavy metal history, heavy metal music, metal odyssey, Music, old school heavy metal bands, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 11, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

It is Thursday, February 11, 2010. The cleanup begins. The cleanup after the Blizzard of 2010 that is. This unreal blizzard attacked the East Coast yesterday, with the great state of Pennsylvania directly in it’s angry path. I’ve seen some major winter storms in my life, this one was a monster in it’s own right. Upwards of nearly two feet of snow blanketed Pennsylvania after 24 hours of snow falling from the sky. Ah, the cleanup that will take place up and down the Eastern Seaboard today… patience shall be a virtue for us all.

As I listened to various music yesterday, I was thinking all along about picking out the perfect blizzard song, a winter song… alas, I was reminded of Angel – The Winter Song. This 1978 song sums it up best… about the spirit of Winter and looking upon this cold, stormy and sometimes isolated season in a different light. Once the holiday season comes to a close, the Winter season takes on it’s own ominous and elongated meaning unlike any other time of year. Still, Winter is here, the blizzards will come and life goes on. Winter, I have learned, is what you make of it. As long as I’m alive to experience this season despite the often times chaotic weather events it brings, I should just be happy that it’s a brand new day.

HAPPY ANNIVERSARY TO MY UNMISTAKABLY LOYAL AND LOVING WIFE TODAY! 15 YEARS! IT’S THE OFFICIAL DAY! THANK YOU FOR EVERYTHING YOU DO AND FOR WORKING SO HARD HONEY! THIS SONG IS FOR YOU TOO!

LONG LIVE ANGEL AND MY MARRIAGE!

If you feel like it, you can check out the post I wrote about Angel and their 1978 Angel album – White Hot, by clicking the header below. I wrote this post back on April 4, 2009.

Angel – Heavy Metal roots from 1978

KISS – 1974 ALBUM “HOTTER THAN HELL” IS STILL JUST THAT IN 2010

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's rock guitarists, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's hard rock, 1970's heavy metal, 1970's heavy metal albums, 1970's heavy metal bands, 1970's heavy metal music, 1970's Rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's heavy metal bands, 1990's heavy metal bands, Album Review, classic heavy metal albums, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, collecting classic rock, collecting heavy metal albums, cool album covers, current heavy metal bands, guitar legends, hard rock music, heavy metal album covers, heavy metal albums, heavy metal bands, heavy metal bands 2010, heavy metal history, heavy metal music, metal odyssey, Music, old school heavy metal, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

In 1974 I was only eight years old. In 1974 KISS released their Hotter Than Hell album on Casablanca Records. I had not a clue as to who or what KISS was back in ’74. The heaviest bands I was listening to that year, was my mother’s Everly Brothers album and Josie And The Pussycats, (a Hanna-Barbera cartoon of a female Rock Band). It wasn’t until 1978 that I owned my very first KISS album, KISS Double Platinum, so I was only four years away from becoming a member of the KISS Army. I eventually traded for the vinyl/album copy of Hotter Than Hell, I was in High School at the time, now I can’t even recall the dude’s name who traded it to me. In later years, (sometime in the early to mid 1990’s), I sold this same Hotter Than Hell album to a crusty and shady record dealer. I regret that move… for a good number of years I went without replacing Hotter Than Hell in my Heavy Metal Music collection. Now, it is Metal safe to say, that I do own Hotter Than Hell on CD… and I am not parting with it – not a Metal chance. This is arguably, one of the greatest KISS albums ever created, a 1970’s Vintage Heavy Metal gem. Am I going too far or thick with the accolades here? Not a Metal chance again… just compare this album to a wide array of Hard Rock or Heavy Metal releases, just in the past decade alone, I am then convinced Hotter Than Hell is still just that in 2010 – Hotter Than Hell.

I will not lie to the fact, that this album does sound like it was recorded back in the early 1970’s. Dated? Alright, sure, only how much of a negative impact does that have on Hotter Than Hell as a whole? Not every song on Hotter Than Hell can be construed as dated either. I really can’t stomach the word dated when it comes to Rock, Hard Rock or Heavy Metal Music, it is a word that only should be used by archaeologists, who dig up ancient relics and/or artifacts underneath some pyramids or rain forest. Besides, the word dated has been politely replaced with two words that are more Metal politically correct… they are… Classic Rock. Whoever the dude or dudette is out there, that came up with the idea of creating the music genre – Classic Rock, is in my Metal mind… a very cool genius.

Excuse my going off on sort of a Metal tangent in the last paragraph, it has been awhile since my last one, plus it felt really, really good. It did.

When you listen to Strange Ways, the very last song on Hotter Than Hell, I cannot ignore the fact that Ace Frehley plays some unreal licks, all the while the repeated riff is decades worth of relevance. Comin’ Home is a KISS song that easily could have been on any KISS album up to and including their Unmasked album from 1980. Mainline is as authentic of a Hard Rock song from the 1970’s as I can ever point out. This is, (probably), my favorite Peter Criss sung KISS tune ever. Yes, that means I like Peter Criss singing Mainline a whole lot more than the ultra classic ballad… Beth. Hotter Than Hell and Let Me Go, Rock ‘n’ Roll are the two most famous songs from this album, they honestly are the top two tracks, only there are the other eight songs that truly shouldn’t take a back seat to them.

This vintage KISS album flows along like a Hard Rock meets Heavy Metal dream gone wild… 1974 style. Goin’ Blind is Gene Simmons at his extreme best vocally, (in my Metal opinion), just an amazing KISS song that in Metal hindsight, is a pioneering power ballad. I can listen to Goin’ Blind 20 times in a row and still feel the need to hear it again… and again. No, I am not kidding about that. Regardless if you are a KISS fan or not, Hotter Than Hell belongs in any Hard Rock or Heavy Metal album collection… it’s that genuine.

Hotter Than Hell is an album to uphold, play loud and enjoy for a lifetime. Long Live KISS.

KISS On Hotter Than Hell:

Gene Simmons – bass guitar, vocals

Paul Stanley – rhythm guitar, vocals

Ace Frehley – lead guitar

Peter Criss – drums, percussion & vocals

Hey, cut me some Metal slack… I was only 8 years old when I was into Josie And The Pussycats.

I was a toddler… Gee Metal whiz.

HEAVY METAL FLASHBACK: MONSTERS OF ROCK, U.K. 1980, CONCERT POSTER!

Posted in 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's heavy metal bands, 1980's hard rock albums, 1980's heavy metal albums, 1980's hard rock bands, 1980's heavy metal bands, 1980's heavy metal music, 1980's metal bands, 1990's heavy metal bands, 1990's heavy metal music, classic hard rock, classic heavy metal, classic rock, classic rock music, collecting heavy metal albums, concerts, current heavy metal bands, hard rock music, heavy metal albums, heavy metal bands, heavy metal concert posters, heavy metal history, heavy metal memorabilia, heavy metal music, heavy metal music 1980, metal music, metal odyssey, Music, new wave of british heavy metal, new wave of british heavy metal bands, old school hard rock, old school heavy metal, old school heavy metal bands, rock music, vintage hard rock bands, vintage heavy metal bands with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 2, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

Here is a Heavy Metal blast from the past! Man, I wish I attended this Heavy Metal festival! This vintage poster promoted the inaugural Monsters Of Rock festival at Castle Donington Raceway, Derbyshire, U.K., August 16, 1980. I was a freshman in High School back in 1980, plus I did not live in the U.K. either. Regardless, this is as fine a lineup of Heavy Metal bands that you could possibly ask for… going back to 1980. Rainbow headlining, with Graham Bonnet on lead vocals! Obviously, the Down To Earth Tour for Rainbow. Judas Priest, whoa, they were supporting their now ultra classic – British Steel album. Scorpions… wow… their Animal Magnetism album was already in the hands of fans when this festival took place. April Wine was out there supporting their Harder… Faster album, classic. Just how much praise can be said for Saxon? Tons! Saxon was out there, sandwiched in between supporting their Wheels Of Steel album, (released in May 1980) and their upcoming album – Strong Arm Of The Law, (released in October 1980).

Riot was out there supporting their Narita album, (an October 1979 release), while their Fire Down Under album was on the Metal horizon for a February, 1981 release. Touch was a relative newcomer, a melodic Rock/Hard Rock Band, they have the distinction of being the first band to open for this Castle Donington, U.K., Monsters Of Rock Festival. Touch was supporting their debut album, aptly titled… Touch. Neal Kaye I really do not know much about… maybe someone out there does? Drop a comment if you do, it would be Metal welcomed and appreciated.

This is without a Metal doubt, a vintage Heavy Metal concert poster I would love to own, an original printing would be preferred by me too. Aw, heck, I wouldn’t mind owning a reprint as well. I just really get into researching this stuff… it is Heavy Metal History, Rock History. Reading about and reflecting upon Heavy Metal History makes for a strong and great Metal mind. It is these concerts, festivals and the Heavy Metal Bands from yesteryear that played them… that make up the building blocks of what Heavy Metal is today… in 2010. Heavy Metal as we all know it today, would not be the same, without these legendary bands that played this historic Monsters Of Rock festival, back in 1980.

Judas Priest, Scorpions and Saxon are still Heavy Metal powerhouses… ’nuff said about their incredible legacies to Heavy Metal. Rainbow, despite not having a long standing band lineup or lead singer, is nonetheless as important as any Heavy Metal/Hard Rock band from their generation. Every Rainbow band lineup, will forever hold a special place in my Metal heart. From Ronnie James Dio fronted Rainbow to Doogie White at the mic, Rainbow… Rocks. Riot and April Wine may not have received the commercial acclaim of the other bands I have mentioned, regardless, they both are very important contributors to the historical development of Heavy Metal Music… in my Metal opinion.

LONG LIVE HEAVY METAL!


STYX “PARADISE THEATRE” – 1981 ROCK ALBUM IS A FOREVER FAVORITE OF MINE

Posted in 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's rock bands, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's classic rock guitarists, 1980's classic rock vocalists, 1980's rock albums, 1980's rock music, 1980's classic rock, 1980's classic rock albums, 1980's classic rock music, 1980's classic rock songs, 1980's hard rock bands, 1980's rock bands, Album Review, classic hard rock bands, classic hard rock music, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, classic rock music 1981, classic rock songs, classic rock vocalists, cool album covers, feel good stories, guitar legends, hard rock music, metal odyssey, Music, old school hard rock, rock & roll, rock album review, rock and roll, rock guitarists, rock keyboard musicians, rock music, rock music lyrics, rock vocalists, shopping for rock music, vintage rock albums, vintage rock and roll songs with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 18, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

Styx, a Rock/Hard Rock band that didn’t just grow on me in my early teens… instead, I fell over backwards upon my very first listen to their song Come Sail Away from The Grand Illusion album, (released in 1977). Jumping across the Pieces Of Eight (1978) and Cornerstone (1979) albums from Styx, (which both are unreal great albums for me as well), there is Paradise Theatre, (A&M Records), from 1981. Call it music imbedding at age fifteen, this Styx album just reminds me of so many good things about my life as an early teen. Memories, especially the good ones, are priceless. When music, Rock Music, can rekindle cool and fun times through memories… man, I’m not going to stop listening to such respective albums or songs – ever. Paradise Theatre doesn’t remind me of winning the lottery, getting an expensive car, falling in love, achieving straight A’s on my report card, (yeah right), nor does it send me back to a Hawaiian vacation. Nope. What Paradise Theatre does remind me of, is easier times, hanging out, the Christmas Holiday, snow days off from school and having no clue of who or what I wanted to be in life. Honestly, this Paradise Theatre album really reminds me of those things, the smaller things in life that matter too.

I’m certain I can sit here and compile a master list of Rock, Hard Rock and Heavy Metal albums, that meet the same memory criteria as this Styx Paradise Theatre album bestows for me. Recently, I finally purchased Paradise Theatre on CD, for the first time in my life! It was priced at $7, brand new. There were several, if not dozens of moments where I had this CD in my hands to buy… only putting it back down, because I get so damned conscientious about spending too much money on non essential items for myself. (I have to learn to relax, $7 is chump change compared to what is spent on Wall Street bailouts).

I cannot pinpoint the reason as to why Paradise Theatre reminds me of the previously mentioned. All I know is, come Christmas, these songs from this album just “pop” into my head. Watch out if it snows, it seems like I can actually envision the album cover in my mind as well, all the while I watch a snowfall. I do remember listening to the songs from Paradise Theatre during the Winter of 1981, it seems like yesterday. Funny, how I purchased this CD during the Winter of 2009, all of the variables were in place… some snow was on the ground, Christmas is approaching and I threw danger to the wind by spending an extra $7 on myself. (I guess you can call me a real thrill seeker, on the spending part of it all).

Every song on Paradise Theatre is a winner, that includes the songs that never made it to FM radio too. Quality, substance and an acute attention to lyrics are what makes these songs on Paradise Theatre so unbelievable for me. This album Rocks. There, I got that out of my system, that phrase needed to be stated and has become rather nerdy and extremely cliche too. Back in 1981, I never would understand what the term Classic Rock meant. In 1981, the only music that was really classic was Classical Music. Styx, through their albums of the 1970’s and 1980’s have given true meaning and understanding to the term/genre… Classic Rock.

I have always been a huge fan of Tommy Shaw, following his solo career along with his stints in Damn Yankees and Shaw/Blades. Dennis DeYoung on vocals gives this Styx band and album their trademark Rock essence, a sound that is so much stand alone. Dennis DeYoung’s voice is a trademark musical instrument of Styx. Of course, the aforementioned are all my opinions and interpretations, which I am steadfast about.

Dennis DeYoung sings it so right, on the song The Best Of Times, with these lines:

Our memories of yesterday

Will last a lifetime

We’ll take the best, forget the rest

And someday we’ll find

These are the best of times

Track Listing For Paradise Theatre:

Side One:

A.D. 1928

Rockin’ The Paradise

Too Much Time On My Hands

Nothing Ever Goes As Planned

The Best Of Times

Side Two:

Lonely People

She Cares

Snowblind

Half-Penny; Two Penny

A.D. 1958

State Street Sadie

Styx, as they appeared on Paradise Theatre:

Dennis DeYoung – keyboards & vocals

Tommy Shaw – guitars & vocals

Chuck Panozzo – bass guitar

John Panozzo – drums & percussion

James Young – guitars & vocals


THE OUTLAWS – THIS LEGENDARY BAND CURES MY SOUTHERN ROCK FIX

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's classic rock vocalists, 1970's southern rock albums, 1970's southern rock music, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's rock music, 1970's southern rock bands, 1970's southern rock songs, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's classic rock vocalists, 1980's southern rock music, 1980's classic rock music, 1980's classic rock songs, 1980's southern rock, 1990's southern rock music, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, classic rock songs, classic rock vocalists, essential southern rock albums, metal odyssey, Music, old school southern rock music, rock music, southern rock, southern rock albums, southern rock music, southern rock music legends, southern rock songs, vintage southern rock albums, vintage southern rock bands with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

There are many moments I dive right into the Southern Rock genre. My wide array of favorite bands crosses over many Rock genres and I am all the better for it. (Metal will always be #1 for me, that will never change). The blue collar, American made and guitar enriched sound of Southern Rock, both past and present, just sticks to me like molasses. I honestly can’t go very long, without nurturing the country boy side of me, with this ever important branch of American Rock and Roll. Aw heck, Southern Rock serves my city boy side just as well too. The Outlaws have been my recent listening choice to cure my Southern Rock fix. A classic of a band indeed are The Outlaws. Great songs and down to earth lyrics has this band written. The Outlaws may not be as heavy as Molly Hatchet or as popular as Lynyrd Skynyrd, still they managed to differentiate themselves amongst their peers by staying true to their own style. The Outlaws have their respectful place in Southern Rock history… Rock history too, for that matter.

The Outlaws, through their own songs, have never pretended to be anything but Southern Rock. I have always admired any band that never compromises their own genuine sound, The Outlaws are one of these bands. Does all this sound like I am overextending praise towards The Outlaws? In my opinion, no. Sure, all of the accolades you read here are from my personal standpoint, yet I would gamble to guess I am not alone in my viewpoint. I really enjoy the Southern Rock that The Outlaws have created, this goes all the way back to my teen years of the 1980’s. Green Grass & High Tides, (from the 1975 debut album Outlaws), the almost ten minute Southern Rock epic, just sends me into a care free mood where things seem to feel alright. This is a song that encompasses the true energy, passion and sound of mid 1970’s Southern Rock. I have always liked this song so much, it is like listening to a three minute song for me.

All of the most memorable and legendary songs from The Outlaws are from 1975 to 1980. Counting the Ghost Riders album from 1980, The Outlaws released three studio albums during the 1980’s, while releasing Diablo Canyon in 1994. The main constant and founding member of The Outlaws, Hughie Thomasson on lead vocals and guitar, is a musician I have and always will appreciate tremendously. He penned Green Grass & High Tides, while co-writing There Goes Another Love Song, two of perhaps the most recognizable Southern Rock songs of the 1970’s, both from such an important debut album. Hurry Sundown, (from the 1977 album Hurry Sundown) and (Ghost) Riders In The Sky, (from the 1980 album Ghost Riders) are two more unreal favorites of mine from The Outlaws.

I bought The Outlaws Super Hits recently, a greatest hits that spans their albums 1975 thru 1980. To have ten solid songs from The Outlaws, on one disc, is a recipe for Classic Southern Rock to the highest degree. This CD set me back just 5 dollars… fifty cents a song. Not to sound cliche here… that is priceless, especially when these songs from The Outlaws make me feel so darn good.

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