Archive for the 1970's classic rock albums Category

MY FAVORITE HARD ROCK ALBUM COVER IS…

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's hard rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, Hard Rock, hard rock albums, hard rock bands, hard rock music, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

Well, I posted what my favorite Heavy Metal album cover, (ever), is on March 25, just a few days ago. Iron Maiden’s debut album – Iron Maiden was/is my choice. Now, for my favorite Hard Rock album cover, (ever), that I would like to share to all, on the planet we call… Earth. Nazareth – No Mean City. This incredibly underrated Rock meets Hard Rock album was released back in January of 1979. May The Sunshine has it’s unique style – from a folk chorus to it’s overlay of genuine Nazareth Rock, it’s a fun filled listen for me always. The ballad Star is another tremendous listen, showing just how Nazareth could diversify their sound with the upmost credibility. Just To Get Into It is indicative of Nazareth Hard Rock, with Dan McCafferty’s vocals spilling out in all of his raspy splendor.

This unreal great cover art on No Mean City just screams Heavy Metal… only this is seriously a Rock colliding with Hard Rock album, in my Metal opinion. Rodney Matthews is the artist/illustrator for this incredible No Mean City album cover. In doing my Metal research, Rodney Matthews has quite the illustrious career in illustrating album covers for many bands of notoriety: Scorpions, Magnum, Thin Lizzy, Tygers of Pan Tang and Diamond Head… just to name a few. I applaud this fantastically talented artist, he gets a Metal Odyssey nod of Metal approval – multi-tenfold!

A long time ago, in a Metal year far, far, away, I bought this No Mean City album from a “cut-out” bin at a record store called Strawberries Records & Tapes. If you like, you can check out the post I did on this legendary album, with a more detailed review, by clicking on the header below:

NAZARETH “NO MEAN CITY” – 1979 HARD ROCK ALBUM IS A DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH

What is your favorite Hard Rock album cover? No Mean City just takes the Hard Rock cake for me.

Stone.

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DOUG FIEGER – REST PEACEFULLY AND THANK YOU FOR THE MUSIC

Posted in 1970's #1 rock songs, 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's Rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, 1979 rock albums, 1980's rock bands, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock cover songs, classic rock music, classic rock music 1979, classic rock songs, classic rock vocalists, metal odyssey, Music, Rock, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock and roll news, rock guitarists, rock music, rock music history, rock vocalists with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 16, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

I remember buying this debut album from The Knack, Get The Knack brings back some fond memories for me. My late sister and I made a beeline to the Caldor department store to buy this album, sometime during the Summer of ’79. We got the biggest kick out of this album, especially the hit My Sharona. I recall listening to the song Good Girls Don’t and feeling really cool about it too. Doug Fieger and The Knack made a fun and good old fashioned Rock and Roll album with Get The Knack. Just a classic album period. I had sold this album years ago… and truly regretted it afterwards, for vinyl was no longer on store shelves. On one of my journey’s last year for Heavy Metal finds, I found a beautiful copy of Get The Knack at a thrift store for 50 cents. This new found copy is for keeps.

Thank you for the music Doug Fieger, rest in peace.

Doug Fieger – 1952 – 2010

Singer, Guitarist, Songwriter

In 2009, HammerFall covered The Knack classic – My Sharona. This cover song is found on the HammerFall album – No Sacrifice, No Victory. This is an excellent example of how Doug Fieger and The Knack are an influence in respective Heavy Metal circles. When I first heard this cover of My Sharona by HammerFall, I was reminded of just how great this song really is. HammerFall paid an incredible tribute to this song and The Knack, in my Metal opinion. Of course, no band can top The Knack in covering My Sharona, this is a Heavy Metal salute to a legendary Rock and Roll Band and musician, whose music shall live on.  So, crank up this My Sharona cover by HammerFall below, sing along if you will, let’s all give a Heavy Metal tribute and thank you to Doug Fieger and his Rock and Roll legacy!

HAPPY METAL BIRTHDAY TO AYNSLEY DUNBAR!

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's hard rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, 1980's heavy metal albums, 1980's rock albums, 1980's rock music, 1980's heavy metal bands, 1980's heavy metal music, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, cool album covers, hard rock drummers, hard rock music, heavy metal albums, heavy metal birthdays, heavy metal drummers, heavy metal music, metal odyssey, Music, old school heavy metal, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock and roll birthdays, rock drummers, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 10, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

Metal Odyssey wants to give out a LOUD Happy Metal Birthday to legendary Rock drummer – Aynsley Dunbar! Aynsley Dunbar turns a solid and cool 64 years of age on January 10th, (born January 10, 1946). Aynsley Dunbar’s association to Heavy Metal is with Whitesnake, UFO and Sammy Hagar, (to name a few), being the drummer on one or some of their respective albums. Being the drummer for Frank Zappa in the early 1970’s is a music milestone in itself. Aynsley was also a member of Journey, being the drummer for their first four studio albums, released from 1975 to 1978. Let’s be real however, Aynsley Dunbar is a fabulous Rock drummer… period. Regardless of Rock genres Aynsley Dunbar has played, at the end of the Metal day it’s all about talent and musical integrity… and he has proved it for decades. A complete list of Rock musicians and bands, that Aynsley has performed with over the decades, would be a who’s who in Rock History for certain. In celebration of Aynsley Dunbar’s birthday and legendary Rock career, I have compiled a very abbreviated list, (in no particular order), of just some of the great Rock, Hard Rock and Heavy Metal albums that he played drums on and bands he was a member of. By no means is this a definitive list of albums that Aynsley Dunbar has appeared on, just a Rock solid salute to his achievements in Rock History.

Thanks for all of the great Rock Music you have created and been a part of Aynsley Dunbar.

Visit the Official Web Site of Aynsley Dunbar by clicking here: Aynsley Dunbar – Legendary Rock Drummer – Official Site

Whitesnake – Whitesnake, (1987)

UFO – Convenant, (2000)

UFO – Sharks, (2002)

Journey – Journey, (1975)

Journey – Look Into The Future, (1976)

Journey – Next, (1977)

Journey – Infinity, (1978)

David Bowie – Diamond Dogs, (1974)

Frank Zappa – Apostrophe (‘), 1974

Jefferson Starship – Winds Of Change, (1982)

Ian Hunter – All American Alien Boy, (1976)

Mick Ronson – Slaughter On 10th Avenue, (1974)


KISS – 1974 ALBUM “HOTTER THAN HELL” IS STILL JUST THAT IN 2010

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's rock guitarists, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's hard rock, 1970's heavy metal, 1970's heavy metal albums, 1970's heavy metal bands, 1970's heavy metal music, 1970's Rock, 1970's rock bands, 1970's rock music, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's heavy metal bands, 1990's heavy metal bands, Album Review, classic heavy metal albums, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, collecting classic rock, collecting heavy metal albums, cool album covers, current heavy metal bands, guitar legends, hard rock music, heavy metal album covers, heavy metal albums, heavy metal bands, heavy metal bands 2010, heavy metal history, heavy metal music, metal odyssey, Music, old school heavy metal, rock & roll, rock and roll, rock music with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 8, 2010 by Metal Odyssey

In 1974 I was only eight years old. In 1974 KISS released their Hotter Than Hell album on Casablanca Records. I had not a clue as to who or what KISS was back in ’74. The heaviest bands I was listening to that year, was my mother’s Everly Brothers album and Josie And The Pussycats, (a Hanna-Barbera cartoon of a female Rock Band). It wasn’t until 1978 that I owned my very first KISS album, KISS Double Platinum, so I was only four years away from becoming a member of the KISS Army. I eventually traded for the vinyl/album copy of Hotter Than Hell, I was in High School at the time, now I can’t even recall the dude’s name who traded it to me. In later years, (sometime in the early to mid 1990’s), I sold this same Hotter Than Hell album to a crusty and shady record dealer. I regret that move… for a good number of years I went without replacing Hotter Than Hell in my Heavy Metal Music collection. Now, it is Metal safe to say, that I do own Hotter Than Hell on CD… and I am not parting with it – not a Metal chance. This is arguably, one of the greatest KISS albums ever created, a 1970’s Vintage Heavy Metal gem. Am I going too far or thick with the accolades here? Not a Metal chance again… just compare this album to a wide array of Hard Rock or Heavy Metal releases, just in the past decade alone, I am then convinced Hotter Than Hell is still just that in 2010 – Hotter Than Hell.

I will not lie to the fact, that this album does sound like it was recorded back in the early 1970’s. Dated? Alright, sure, only how much of a negative impact does that have on Hotter Than Hell as a whole? Not every song on Hotter Than Hell can be construed as dated either. I really can’t stomach the word dated when it comes to Rock, Hard Rock or Heavy Metal Music, it is a word that only should be used by archaeologists, who dig up ancient relics and/or artifacts underneath some pyramids or rain forest. Besides, the word dated has been politely replaced with two words that are more Metal politically correct… they are… Classic Rock. Whoever the dude or dudette is out there, that came up with the idea of creating the music genre – Classic Rock, is in my Metal mind… a very cool genius.

Excuse my going off on sort of a Metal tangent in the last paragraph, it has been awhile since my last one, plus it felt really, really good. It did.

When you listen to Strange Ways, the very last song on Hotter Than Hell, I cannot ignore the fact that Ace Frehley plays some unreal licks, all the while the repeated riff is decades worth of relevance. Comin’ Home is a KISS song that easily could have been on any KISS album up to and including their Unmasked album from 1980. Mainline is as authentic of a Hard Rock song from the 1970’s as I can ever point out. This is, (probably), my favorite Peter Criss sung KISS tune ever. Yes, that means I like Peter Criss singing Mainline a whole lot more than the ultra classic ballad… Beth. Hotter Than Hell and Let Me Go, Rock ‘n’ Roll are the two most famous songs from this album, they honestly are the top two tracks, only there are the other eight songs that truly shouldn’t take a back seat to them.

This vintage KISS album flows along like a Hard Rock meets Heavy Metal dream gone wild… 1974 style. Goin’ Blind is Gene Simmons at his extreme best vocally, (in my Metal opinion), just an amazing KISS song that in Metal hindsight, is a pioneering power ballad. I can listen to Goin’ Blind 20 times in a row and still feel the need to hear it again… and again. No, I am not kidding about that. Regardless if you are a KISS fan or not, Hotter Than Hell belongs in any Hard Rock or Heavy Metal album collection… it’s that genuine.

Hotter Than Hell is an album to uphold, play loud and enjoy for a lifetime. Long Live KISS.

KISS On Hotter Than Hell:

Gene Simmons – bass guitar, vocals

Paul Stanley – rhythm guitar, vocals

Ace Frehley – lead guitar

Peter Criss – drums, percussion & vocals

Hey, cut me some Metal slack… I was only 8 years old when I was into Josie And The Pussycats.

I was a toddler… Gee Metal whiz.

RAINBOW “DOWN TO EARTH” – 1979 ALBUM REVISITED

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's classic rock vocalists, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's hard rock, 1970's heavy metal, 1970's rock music, 1980's hard rock bands, 1980's heavy metal bands, Album Review, classic hard rock bands, classic hard rock music, classic rock bands, classic rock cover songs, classic rock music, classic rock music 1979, classic rock songs, cool album covers, guitar legends, hard rock music, heavy metal bands, heavy metal history, heavy metal music, heavy metal on vinyl, metal odyssey, Music, old school hard rock, old school heavy metal, rock guitarists, rock music, vintage hard rock albums with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 8, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

Here is a Rainbow album that I can never get enough of. Down To Earth, released on July 28, 1979. This Rainbow lineup is nothing short of legendary, unreal musicians they were together. I actually saved this vinyl copy of Down To Earth since the mid 1980’s, never having the thought of letting it go. Graham Bonnet on vocals is tops… for me. This album just illuminates Hard Rock meets Heavy Metal legitimacy, in my Metal opinion. To this day, I will crank up, (extremely loud), the two songs: All Night Long and Since You Been Gone. I endorse the other six songs on this album as well… songs like these are what makes a complete and memorable album. I often times, find it hard to believe that Down To Earth was released back in 1979, saying these songs are dated will never cross my Metal mind.

I have always embraced each lead singer that fronted Rainbow over the years. Each new lead vocalist lent a different sound and feel, while the hardness of Rainbow never seemed to wane for me. Ronnie James Dio, Graham Bonnet, Joe Lynn Turner and Doogie White made each respective Rainbow lineup unique. Sure, you can say that there have been four different Rainbow bands… the more Rainbow music that was made, the better, in my Metal opinion! I could never embrace the gossip or rumors that surrounded each Rainbow lineup, all I ever cared about were the albums that were created. Down To Earth seems to be an album that gets skipped over, when discussions/articles of great Hard Rock releases of the ’70’s are brought forth. Maybe my blabbing about this Rainbow Down To Earth album will inspire someone to give it a listen again or for the first time, it is extremely well worth it.

Listening to this Rainbow album puts me in a darn good mood. Heck, any Rainbow album puts me in a good mood and sets me straight. I wish that Ritchie Blackmore kept the Rainbow brand moving forward. Regardless, I’ll embrace and enjoy the Rainbow albums that did become reality… especially Down To Earth.

The Rainbow lineup for Down To Earth… and what a lineup:

Ritchie Blackmore – guitar

Graham Bonnet – lead vocalist

Roger Glover – bass guitarist

Cozy Powell – drums

Don Airey – keyboards

The track list for Down To Earth… these are songs, no fillers:

All Night Long

Eyes of the World

No Time to Lose

Makin’ Love

Since You Been Gone

Love’s No Friend

Danger Zone

Lost in Hollywood

* Since You Been Gone was written and recorded by Russ Ballard, originally appearing on his 1976 album Winning. Russ Ballard wrote one pretty cool song, in my Metal opinion.


THE OUTLAWS – THIS LEGENDARY BAND CURES MY SOUTHERN ROCK FIX

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's classic rock vocalists, 1970's southern rock albums, 1970's southern rock music, 1970's classic rock music, 1970's rock music, 1970's southern rock bands, 1970's southern rock songs, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's classic rock vocalists, 1980's southern rock music, 1980's classic rock music, 1980's classic rock songs, 1980's southern rock, 1990's southern rock music, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, classic rock songs, classic rock vocalists, essential southern rock albums, metal odyssey, Music, old school southern rock music, rock music, southern rock, southern rock albums, southern rock music, southern rock music legends, southern rock songs, vintage southern rock albums, vintage southern rock bands with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 3, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

There are many moments I dive right into the Southern Rock genre. My wide array of favorite bands crosses over many Rock genres and I am all the better for it. (Metal will always be #1 for me, that will never change). The blue collar, American made and guitar enriched sound of Southern Rock, both past and present, just sticks to me like molasses. I honestly can’t go very long, without nurturing the country boy side of me, with this ever important branch of American Rock and Roll. Aw heck, Southern Rock serves my city boy side just as well too. The Outlaws have been my recent listening choice to cure my Southern Rock fix. A classic of a band indeed are The Outlaws. Great songs and down to earth lyrics has this band written. The Outlaws may not be as heavy as Molly Hatchet or as popular as Lynyrd Skynyrd, still they managed to differentiate themselves amongst their peers by staying true to their own style. The Outlaws have their respectful place in Southern Rock history… Rock history too, for that matter.

The Outlaws, through their own songs, have never pretended to be anything but Southern Rock. I have always admired any band that never compromises their own genuine sound, The Outlaws are one of these bands. Does all this sound like I am overextending praise towards The Outlaws? In my opinion, no. Sure, all of the accolades you read here are from my personal standpoint, yet I would gamble to guess I am not alone in my viewpoint. I really enjoy the Southern Rock that The Outlaws have created, this goes all the way back to my teen years of the 1980’s. Green Grass & High Tides, (from the 1975 debut album Outlaws), the almost ten minute Southern Rock epic, just sends me into a care free mood where things seem to feel alright. This is a song that encompasses the true energy, passion and sound of mid 1970’s Southern Rock. I have always liked this song so much, it is like listening to a three minute song for me.

All of the most memorable and legendary songs from The Outlaws are from 1975 to 1980. Counting the Ghost Riders album from 1980, The Outlaws released three studio albums during the 1980’s, while releasing Diablo Canyon in 1994. The main constant and founding member of The Outlaws, Hughie Thomasson on lead vocals and guitar, is a musician I have and always will appreciate tremendously. He penned Green Grass & High Tides, while co-writing There Goes Another Love Song, two of perhaps the most recognizable Southern Rock songs of the 1970’s, both from such an important debut album. Hurry Sundown, (from the 1977 album Hurry Sundown) and (Ghost) Riders In The Sky, (from the 1980 album Ghost Riders) are two more unreal favorites of mine from The Outlaws.

I bought The Outlaws Super Hits recently, a greatest hits that spans their albums 1975 thru 1980. To have ten solid songs from The Outlaws, on one disc, is a recipe for Classic Southern Rock to the highest degree. This CD set me back just 5 dollars… fifty cents a song. Not to sound cliche here… that is priceless, especially when these songs from The Outlaws make me feel so darn good.

FOREIGNER – DEBUT ALBUM FROM 1977 STILL PULLS ME IN

Posted in 1970's classic rock albums, 1970's classic rock bands, 1970's classic rock songs, 1970's classic rock vocalists, 1970's hard rock bands, 1970's hard rock, 1970's Rock, 1970's rock music, 1980's classic rock bands, 1980's hard rock albums, 1980's rock music, 1980's hard rock, Album Review, classic hard rock music, classic rock, classic rock albums, classic rock bands, classic rock music, classic rock music 1977, classic rock songs, cool album covers, essential classic rock albums, essential classic rock songs, everyday social experiences, family, family pets, hard rock music, life, life stories, metal odyssey, Music, real life experiences, Rock, rock & roll, rock album review, rock and roll, rock music, rock music reviews, rock vocalists, vintage hard rock albums, vintage rock albums with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 17, 2009 by Metal Odyssey

Foreigner "Foreigner" small album picThe debut album by Foreigner, (self titled, released on March 8, 1977), was one of my first vinyl record albums that I ever owned. I actually bought the first Foreigner album shortly after receiving their Double Vision album as a birthday gift, back in 1979. (The Double Vision album was released on June 20, 1978). So it is safe to say, that the debut Foreigner album was playing on my turntable sometime in the Spring of 1979. Being an eighth grader in 1979, my exposure to Heavy Metal Music was at it’s most infant state, KISS was the only Heavy Metal Band I owned on album at this time. I always bring up my past history, as to the year of purchase of a said album and what bands I was into at the given time, so to make clarity to the evolvement of my becoming a Metalhead. It was a progression of listening to different Rock genres for me, since I was a kid. This Foreigner album is as integral a piece to that progression, as any other Rock album I ever listened to. Just as the Double Vision album, Foreigner’s debut album had me wanting more and that was a good symptom to have. There definitely was some psychological imbedding that happened to me with Foreigner at a young age, whenever I listen to their albums, (especially the first four), I feel like everything is alright.

What prompted me to blog about this Foreigner debut album is hearing the song Feels Like The First Time on the radio this past Sunday. My family and I just had to endure visiting a sad animal shelter that morning, (we are currently looking to adopt a cat), and all four of us were in quite the funk. I decided to bring my wife to a store that has 70% off of all their Christmas decor, what bargains were truly found – no kidding here. This stop to purchase Christmas decor was just the elixir of happy that my wife and daughters needed after a somber morning of seeing so many poor and sickly cats. My elixir of happy was hearing Foreigner on the store’s radio. As I have stated, Foreigner puts me on the – everything is alright trip. I actually felt my face give off a smile and get all flushed while I heard this Foreigner song. On the drive home from this store, I wished there was a Foreigner CD in the car… trust me, there has been many times.

This experience is just a fine example of how a band and their album can pull me right in… and take me back, while making my mood alright again. That is the magic of Rock and Roll, these are the benchmarks of an album and/or song that cannot be critiqued by lazy Rolling Stone Magazine writers who have not a clue. The personal memories and feelings that are stored within oneself, due to the impact from a Rock Band of any genre, their albums, an individual song or a concert experience from such band… money cannot buy, man. Listening to Foreigner’s debut again, reminds me as to why the Classic Rock genre exists. This album is a Rock Classic. Foreigner is in my Metal Odyssey Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Too bad that big, pompous building in Cleveland, Ohio, doesn’t get it.

I grin each time I stare at the front cover image of the band, on the Foreigner debut front cover. The first impression is – these are gentlemen. Hard Rock gentlemen, that is. The maturity that this front cover image evokes, also mirrors the maturity of the music heard from this Foreigner album. It wasn’t about boobs and beer, rebellion or political commentary, it was about quality Rock and Hard Rock songs. From the lyrics to each songs structure, Foreigner presented to the world a sophisticated, yet Hard edged sound, that could be radio friendly and street cool at the same time. Two of my favorite songs from Foreigner are not even considered to be hits at all. Headknocker and Starrider are two songs from this album that are individualistic and represent the two sides of Foreigner’s Rock style. Headknocker being the Hard Rock cranker and Starrider introducing Foreigner’s adoration for a more melodic, Rock ballad. I really like Starrider for it’s almost cosmic musical ambiance, the keyboards and chorus are what sets this song apart, for me. This is just me, yet it would be a kick to hear W.A.S.P. or Judas Priest cover Headknocker.

Long, Long Way From Home is without doubt, Lou Gramm singing at his very finest. Man, his vocals alone, makes this song resonate with powerful emotion. Cold As Ice will always be the hit staple from this Foreigner album… rightfully so. I would not argue that it is as important a Rock single as any from the 1970’s. Regardless of decades passing by, this Foreigner debut album is, yes, timeless. It may sound cliche, still those Rock and Hard Rock albums from days gone by, like this very album, need to be revisited and remembered for their Rock and Roll historical importance and sheer quality.

Foreigner "Foreigner" large album pic

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